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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
to what's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through the woods and you hear the crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day, we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impa
environment. of course he's got a good record on inflation. he got lucky as it per takes to inflation because we had deleveraging. >> andy bush, the best part of jim is he's going to give you all these reasons, what does he call them, doppelganger reasons. when you have lecamp on the show it's not what he says it's what he's doing. he's like a federal government official. not watch what he says but what he's doing. that's why i love the guy. look at him he can't stop smiling. neither can you. you're both great. thank you so much. now folks, a busy day and night on capitol hill. the senate is busy voting on amendment after amendment in their budget bill. we got two distinguished senators about to join us give us their take and later on the show why can't police departments get any ammunition while the department of homeland security has bought up 1.6 billion rounds in the past year. there's no ammo for handdowns, shot guns, rifles, for training. what's up with this or is the dhs in a form of gun control that the congress can't legislate? folks don't forget free market capitalism is the best pa
creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the climate, while at the same time taking into due account the solidarity we owe to those living in the poorer areas of our world and to future generations." in his inaugural mass this morning, pope francis said, and i quote -- "please, i would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life and all men and women of goodwill, let us be protectors of creation, protectors of god's plannen scribed in nature -- plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment. as early news reports indicated, the new pope chose his papal name, francis, out of respect for st. francis' sense of obligation to god's creation, and he noted in one of his very earliest comments that our relationship with god's creation is not so good right now. and of course, the pope is not the only one. ecumenical patriot remark bartholomew 1 of constantinople, the spiritual leader of orthodox christians, urges u
certain obligations and i think we're going to have to reassess. the environment has changed. if there's still time far two-state solution we're on the last leg. >> warner: why the last leg? >> israelis and arabs no longer believe in the two-state solution. >> warner: during our recent trip in january, we found many palestinians who've lost belief in the peace process. nasser hantuni owns birds of peace, a pet shop just inside the west bank. he works in site of the security wall israel erected during second palestinian intifada, or uprising, in the early 2000s. >> ( translated ): we feel very frustrated. for the past 20 to 22 years we've had hope in negotiations and yet there are no concrete results on the ground and still we haven't reached peace. all we sue is more settlements, the wall, checkpoints, closures and constraints over the palestinians. 90% of us have lost hope of reaching a peaceful solution with the israelis. >> warner: do you think that there's a possibility that if nothing happens on the peace front more violence will break out? >> it could be, yes. it is a valid alter
students are mostly caught in a liberal environment whether they like it or not. enter ryan row rotela a student north of fort lauderdale. vine mormon enrolled in a communications class taught by the vice chairman of the democratic party if you can believe it dr. deandre poole has been a democratic activist, an activist for years. yet, is he running that class. and as part of the course, dr. poole apparently ordered his students to disrespect jesus. >> he said everybody write jesus on bold letters so what i did was wrote jesus just like this. afterwards he said everybody put it on the floor. he took it out. put it on the floor and he had us all stand up once we were standing up he said stomped on it that's when i picked up the paper from the floor and put it right back on the table. any time you stomp on something it shows that you believe something has no value. so, if you were to stomp on the word jesus, it says that the word has no value. >> bill: ryan rotela was angry about the incident and made his displeasure known. he was removed by the class by florida atlantic university. ryan
to the environment or whatever climate change, would be most acute. that does not appear to be the case. >> well, i think that the folks over there have common sense. they understand that one/400th n't of the greenhouse gases and man puts in 1% of that so we contribute 1/8,000 new mexico of as far as co2, and the fact the oceans have a thousand times the heat capacity of the air, and the speaker action between the -- interaction between the ocean and air drive the climate, plus the sun. so they say you keep doing that over there and we'll just keep doing what we are doing and they good on their merry way. i do know because i forecast globally i have to make forecasts every day in china, for instance. we have company that de-ices airplanes, and you're acutely aware of what the weather is doing globally as opposed to weather voyeurs who say, it's very warm today. then they hide until the next time they can point out it's word. >> neil: thank you very much. guess what. old man winter ain't done. another storm expected to hit this weekend. say it ant snow. >> it is. it is for a lot of people. a lot of
america's role in the world and it rapidly changing strategic environment, and about america's interests looking forward. and finally i would add the qualification for today's discussion. unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risks with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of a very come one of the most prominent of a very small, very elite, very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than ended his military career, the work is ultimately advanced it. his ph.d thesis contained widely influential book, dereliction of duty, lyndon johnson, robert mic, the joint chiefs mic, the joint chiefs of staff, and the lies that led to vietnam. i think the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. is equally known for brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star for leadership in the 1991 gulf war
environment may also be may, in, such that we the future, rely, as i mentioned at oxford and here again today, on more traditional means of counter-terrorism. it really is the case that armed conflict, targeted legal force, should be regarded as extraordinary and an extraordinary state of affairs to deal with an existing threat came to government grapple with over 12 years ago. almost 12 years ago. i think there is a current debate that deserves a lot of attention, and people in congress, in washington, need to have this discussion, but as i tried to lay out this morning, i see some real practical legal problems. i will take one more question. yes, sir, gentleman in the red tie. i am sorry i missed anyone who has had their hand up. >> i wonder if you could say a of of about the capture wing the test. separately and operating question, and how you create incentive for agencies to develop a greater ability to capture in the future? >> thank you for asking that. i fail to make a point that i wanted to make earlier, which is that when you talk about talk feasibility of capture, those are not nece
for a strong working environment for middle class. we have a different vision on how to get there. one is a government run or government -- where things are dictated from healthcare to regulations. those are the kinds of things i believe stifle growth. i'm part of our freshman group working on regulatory reform. we are going to talk about that. is not take away the ability for someone to take away the pea, -- epa, but it helps those affected by it. there are real business affected. regulations are cutting -- the best way to help this country is to get washington in that so that it is -- so our free-trade agreements can work, so that our products can be sold overseas. free-trade trade is what we need to be part of. follow up onter, your syrian comments, "so you are against sending troops to syria?" said. that's not what i we have to figure out what is the proper role for us to play in syria. again, a comment i heard this morning -- what do we have a un for if it is completely useless ? i agree that right now, the un is basically useless in this situation. here is one thing that is ,mazi
there is something that's happening in the environment. it's obviously causing more cases of autism. i just don't think you can say that. despite the fact that the headlines are going to say, you know, 1 in 50 as compared to 1 in 88, this is now 2% of children in america. i still think that, you know, we know that the numbers are high. we know that over longer periods of time, over decades, they've gone up. and i think the bigger focus is while there is increased awareness and diligence about this, it probably needs to happen earlier in life. the ideal thing with these kids actually be diagnosed, if they have autism, as young as 18 months or even 2 years old, anderson. >> dr. sanjay gupta, appreciate it, thanks. >> thank you. >>> if you want to hear more about this story, go to cnn.com. up next, new developments in a cold case that likely didn't need to go cold. what police in mississippi are doing now about an unsolved hidden killing of an hit and run killing of an african-american man from three years ago. >>> plus it was his job to protect priceless works of art. tonight for the first time,
given the environment we're in now. >> well, first, the most important thing to know, erin, is that the vice president has no control over these costs. the secret service tells him where to travel. the military decides how many of their people travel with him. secret service decides how many of their people will travel with him. and on this particular trip, he was a couple of days in munich at a security conference. he was met with chancellor merkel then went to london. the state department decides the size of the diplomatic corps that travels with him. he absolutely has no control over that. and that in and of itself says that, you know, even people sort of talking about this in this way becomes too political because this isn't something that he can control. >> all right. i hear your point. it would seem to me that an administration that was yelling to the world, all right, that these four spending cuts are a problem that we're dealing with now. would it the least say, we want to show some restraint. we want -- when we're on the -- guys, look at the travel budget. don't ta
is not only the environment -- although he did use the word environment -- but it's also us. it's you and me, our brothers and sisters, it's moms and dads. that's part of our mission in life, to be of service to others. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we tried to get out of the way of the music from time to time. it's mid 50's in rome this morning and pretty steady wind at 15 to 20 miles an hour. you can see making for a beautiful sight with the flags there. the music is not one choir but two. lauren green with some details on those. one of them sang at the pap al mass. >> this is the sistine chapel choir along with the sacred music choir. both of them are vatican choirs. interesting enough, the last time i heard the sistine chapel choir was in november when they premiered a work by monsignor raptsinger, the brother of pope benedict xvi. they are an incredible choir. you saw one of the members, sopranos singing earlier as part of the mass. they are an incredible choir. they have sung all over the world and they are known all over the world, and they sing in many sacred music festivals. they are mainstays of
that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own communications but i certainly have no faith in the privacy protections now. that is why my e-mails are pretty boring. this is a, dealing with sensitive matters of national security does raise a question, i think, whether
for that cycle of prosperity that i described to happen. the job of our government is to create an environment where people are encouraged to and it is easier for them to risk the money they have access to in order to start up a new business or grow an existing business so they can hire more people and create more jobs for others. there's a lot of things that government can do to help create that environment but there are few that are being discussed. i want to point to three. the first thing is predictability. what do i mean by predictability? what i mean by that is that when someone decides i'm going to open up a business, one of the things that encourages them to hire people is that they know what tomorrow's going to look like. they know what the taxes are going to be, they know what the laws are going to be, they know what the economy's going to look like, and so they feel encouraged because they can pl plan, because they know what tomorrow looks like. imagine now for a moment if you are a businessman or a businesswoman and is deciding whether to hire five people next year or not. one of t
job they can to use the funds that we have been given wisely in an awfully unique budget environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? a one-ven-day, 165-day, day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up
-- this initiative proposed focuses on greenhouse gas emissions and make the environment more green and you know, your carbon footprint he when you live in an 800 square foot apartment in manhattan is much, much smaller than if you live in a 3000 square foot home in the burbs, that's clear and could be one of the goals. you also say this is about wealth redistribution on a grand scale. how so? how does the redistribution of wealth? >> well, that's what i talk about in the book, megyn. if you go back to obama's whole political history, peel don't realize it, but he's been a big backer of a movement called regionalism. that there's something fundamentally unfair about the distance of suburbs. when people move out to suburbs, they take their tax money with them and president obama and some of the people he use today work with in his political career believe that that was somehow unfair to the cities. so if you put in the smart gr growth policies and say it's about carbon dioxide and global warming, it funnels into the city and redistributing from the suburbs into the cities. and the mindset of regi
you'll see a depressed environment where the unemployment rate is over 26%, severe austerity cuts and overhauls of gutted worker benefits, safety net programs, harming seniors and the country's poorest populous, taxes on families an businesses have increased at a sharp rate and violent social unrest has become common place. most recently we've seen a proposal to bail out cyprus banks that could raid the savings account of its own population. these are the realities of debt-ridden countries. these are the realities of liberal policies that tax too much, spend too much, borrow too much and produce far too few jobs. we cannot afford the path that we're on. thankfully we have time to change. america's course and the house republican budget provides a so-year plan. it puts brakes on our spending levels, laying out a thoughtful program, reforms to ensure successful government services are solvent for generations to come, prioritizes a comprehensive restructuring of or tax code to simplify the system and improbables our fiscal system in a way -- improves our fiscal system in way that wou
money at this current time in this environment on capitol hill kind of goes against the grain but that is the key way that we can convert our good intentions to real, live aid and make a difference in people's lives on the ground. >> in my testimony are some of the ways we are rushing to help communities who are strained by the influx of refugees, and working with the governments of both these countries to provide additional support. it is an important question, one we are deeply focused on. >> thank you, mr. chairman and folks on the panel for your attendance. ambassador ford, i am wondering regarding the redline, i want some specifics -- what are the possible consequences, and i share your current skepticism, what are the range of possible consequences the american people can expect from the administration as a response? >> congressman, i really do not want to speculate here about hypothetical situations. what i do want to underline that the president has said there will be consequences and that we will seek strongly that the people who use chemical weapons be held accountab
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
should. that centers provide a safe and welcoming homelike environment for veterans receiving home care, counseling, and group settings. veterans often feel very comfortable in that non-root -- non-bureaucratic environment. the mental health services closer to their homes, in certain situations they use madison to link to clinicians in medical centers. the va has done an excellent job in terms of telehealth in general. it is critical that they provide these options for care, making sure they remain available and the veterans know about them. i believe the next hearing that we will have deals without patients in general. you could have the best care in the world, but of the veteran does not know about it, it does no good at all. significant strides forward have been approved. we must do more to insure better prevention for today's service members tomorrow. the army, and i think we are all levelof the frightening of suicides within members of the armed services today. practically one per day. they have got to help us address this issue. based on the efforts of this committee, the behavior
video games. and the office area looks like one big video game. it's a fun work environment, and the people -- and i'm sure they have and provide health -- health wellness whatever program as well. yeah encourage your employees to stay fit. we were talk about the wall street journal neil king is a runner, and the wall street journal will pay his travel expenses, i think within reason -- >> yeah. yeah. >> bill: pay his travel expenses to go to a marathon and entry fee -- >> yeah keep your employees healthy. by the way when are we getting our video game room? >> bill: what do you mean? you are sitting in it. this is one big video game. diana, calling from nashville, tennessee. good morning. >> caller: good morning, bill. i wanted to tell you first i love your show and i wake up extra early just to watch your show, and i watch it and then i take my nap. so i love your show, and i hope you stay on for many years to come. and thank you for addressing the issues that people don't want to touch. >> bill: i appreciate that. and from your lips to god's ears we in
changing strategic environment, and about america's interests looking forward. finally, i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, and like most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside the conventional wisdom when the issue aren't said taking some risks with his own reputation. is one of mcmaster the most prominent of a very small, elite, important class of individuals who have earned the title of warrior soldier. he has been willing to critically examine the past and has done so with such power rather than end his military career, the work has advanced it. his ph.d. in pieces became a widely influential book beliesiction of duty: that led to vietnam." the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. he is equally known for achievement as a combat commander, earning a silver star for leadership in the 1991 gulf war, and even broader recognition for his enormously influential success in the ar in the calif iraq war. he went back and forth between field command and staff positions culminating in h
. the outcome of these particular systems are uknown for the environment. it would be beneficial to the assistance to knock down long- range missiles. host: are you familiar with this? guest: you probably want a meteorologist to talk about these questions. one comment i would make is that weather systems are so enormously powerful compared to even nuclear-weapons in terms of the amount of energy that the idea of modifying them is a daunting proposition. even if we are thinking in non- military terms about hurricanes, my understanding of the problem is that we are quite a ways away from being able to do that. one thing we do not understand is the implications of any intervention leawood try to carry out. these weather systems are intervention we would try to carry up. these budde systems are enormous. not since the debate is not important for the issue is irrelevant. i think we are a ways away from being able to do things with the weather. host: this point on our twitter host: let us go to ramie from baltimore, maryland. caller: a couple of quick points. i think we are talking abo
? the environment is so different. we have taxes and regulations. is it hard to grow a business in today's world? >> i don't think it's any harder. if you have the passion for what you're doing in believe it and find to let you know, what you are best that and exploit that a stake you will be successful. you know, that's what we have done all along. tracy: debt would be proud. but mitt david, but david founder and ceo. it's all about the passion. thank you. adam: politics. tracy: the compression shirt. adam: know because i no you're going to say something in that whatever response to it. thank you very much. it's tough work. even at that. president obama nominated thomas perez as the next labor secretary this morning. some republicans are already voicing concern about this. and jeff flock is live at the white house. i think the senator from louisiana is already saying no way. >> is going to block this in the senate. does not kill the nomination, but it does create some problems for the administration after thomas perez, the president's pick to lead the labor department is at department of justic
are looking at that environment and saying it just doesn't work at the very top if we also want to have children. and so what we have to do is change the structures of the work force. we have got to say to our companies -- and i think this is the biggest feminist revolution. if we can change the shape of that border and table to make it more family friendly and implement more flexible work programs and have careers up and down uncan dial up and dial back again at certain stages. actually those companies find the productivity increases. the companies that say to women and to men we don't care about your input. we care about your output. where and when you work for doesn't matter but what you do produce matters. that works so well for women. in those circumstances, productivity rises for the company and you keep women in the work force. >> i venture to say we might be more productive when we have small children because we're on fire and trying to keep it all going and we are not checked out. every argument made here at the table is valid and i think the bigger point here, whether it's the
strategic environment and about america's interest looking forward. as aly i would add qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. theral mcmaster is one of most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. he is equally known for brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his iraqss in battles in the war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)